Cover Letter

Make sure your resume gets every advantage possible, including a personalized cover letter! Our library of articles covers all aspects of cover letter writing to help you get the job done, with tips on (among other things) best writing practices and how to format.
  • Is a Cover Letter Necessary to Apply for a Job?

    Do you really need a cover letter when you apply for jobs? You might wonder whether you can get by with just a resume — particularly if the company doesn't specifically request or require a cover letter. It's only natural to wonder if a cover letter is necessary. After all, writing cover letters can be a time-consuming and challenging task. If there's an option to skip the labor involved in writing one, it's tempting. But in most cases, and particularly when the overall job market or your specific industry is competitive, a cover letter will help your candidacy. Done right, your letter will highlight your most relevant skills and qualifications for the job, making you stand out in a sea of applicants. **TIP**: Your cover letter is a good way to show an employer what you want them to know about you, without the hiring manager having to figure it out themselves from your resume. ## (Almost) Always Send a Cover Letter Many career experts agree that sending a cover letter is almost always the best decision. ### Use Your Letter to Make a Match For instance, Susan Heathfield, a human resources expert, says, "Your cover letter is particularly important. It's the job searcher's opportunity to help the potential employer see that the applicant's skills and experience match what the employer seeks. A well-written cover letter distinguishes your application." ### Show Why You're a Strong Candidate A cover letter can make a good impression on a prospective employer and is an excellent way to show that employer why you are a strong candidate for the job. Resumes are helpful for giving an overview of your career, but a cover letter can tell a story about specific, relevant experience. They're also a chance to show off your personality. ### Explain Potential Issues Cover letters also provide a useful way to explain away any potential concerns the employer might have about your candidacy, such as gaps in your employment or the fact that you will need to relocate for the job. ### Make the Case for Your Candidacy A cover letter allows you to write a compelling case for your candidacy. Why would you want to skip this opportunity? Even if a job application does not require a cover letter, you can send one anyway. Often, employers expect a cover letter even if they do not directly ask for one. Sending one, particularly when it is not required, demonstrates that you are a motivated candidate. **NOTE**: Cover letters allow you—in narrative form—to tell the employer exactly why hiring you, instead of the numerous other candidates, is a good decision. ## When Not to Send a Cover Letter If you're applying online for a job and there is no way to upload or post a cover letter, don't worry about it. You don't need one. When the employer specifically states what they want in a job application (resume, references, etc.), you don't have to write a cover letter if it is not included on the employer's list. However, you may want to include an abbreviated email cover letter if there’s space to do so. Don’t miss out on the opportunity to make your pitch and impress the hiring manager. ### Cover Letter Writing Tips **Make sure your cover letter is a good one** While a well-written cover letter may increase your chances of getting an interview, the opposite is also true. A poorly written cover letter will likely cause an employer to reject your application. Therefore, only send one if you have the time to write a clear, concise, and professional letter that makes a strong sales pitch for getting an interview. **Write a targeted cover letter that specifically relates your experience to the job posting**Keep it short and sweet — aim for three to five paragraphs — with each paragraph focusing on an aspect of your candidacy. Read the job description carefully, so you can make sure your cover letter really speaks to the requested qualifications. Bottom line, you want to make it clear why you'd be beneficial to the company in the position. **Review cover letter samples**Before you start, look at some cover letter examples to get ideas for your own letters. While you don’t want to copy samples, reading them helps reveal what kind of tone is appropriate. Plus, you might discover a better way to emphasize your experience. ## How to Format the Letter **Format your cover letter correctly** Familiarize yourself with cover lettering formatting guidelines and make sure that your materials meet these standards. Hiring managers will notice if you don’t follow these rules. **IMPORTANT**: You want your experience to stand out, not your formatting or style choices. Keep it simple and let your skills shine through. ## Proofread and Test Before You Submit Be sure to edit your cover letter thoroughly. Typos and grammatical errors will demonstrate a sloppy work ethic to the employer. Review proofreading tips to remind yourself of what to watch out for. A few examples of common cover letter typos and mistakes: misspelled names of companies or interviewers, incorrect addresses, and inconsistent verb tenses and/or punctuation. When you’re finished reviewing your final document, have a friend take a look as well. A fresh set of eyes may catch mistakes that you’re no longer able to see. Even the smallest error can work against you during the job application process, so take the time to get it right.
  • Are Cover Letters Necessary? How Important are Cover Letters?

    If you’re wondering whether you need to send a cover letter, or how important cover letters are to employers, then keep reading. After working for years as a recruiter, I’m going to reveal: When are cover letters necessary, and when are they not needed Why you may be wasting hours sending cover letters that employers don’t read Tips to make sure your cover letter gets read and gets you job interviews Let’s get started… ## How Important are Cover Letters? Many people on LinkedIn and other sites will tell you that you should include a cover letter every time because it “can’t hurt,” but that’s not true… Here’s how it CAN hurt you… Writing a great cover letter takes a LOT of time and mental energy. So if it’s not making a difference, or not even getting read, then it is hurting you in terms of wasted time and energy (I’d argue that writing a cover letter is the toughest and most time-consuming part of the process for many job seekers). ![does-a-resume-need-a-cover-letter.jpg](https://wps-strapi-cms.s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/does_a_resume_need_a_cover_letter_5d228685c4.jpg) Writing a resume is tough, sure. But once you get it, you’re done. You spend 5-15 minutes tailoring it for each specific job you apply for, but that’s it. Cover letters take a lot of time EVERY time (at least when done right). That’s why it’s important to look at how important a cover letter is, and which situations it’s necessary and truly beneficial in. ## Three Situations Where Cover Letters Are Necessary: There are a couple of specific scenarios where cover letters are necessary, and you should send one. This article by Harvard Business Review says it best: ![cover-letter-kraked-768x215.png](https://wps-strapi-cms.s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/cover_letter_kraked_768x215_857f7c890d.png) In those cases, according to Harvard Business Review, you can boost your chances of getting the interview by writing a short letter to point out similarities between your resume and the job requirements (e.g. why you’d do well in their job)… rather than leaving the analysis entirely up to the hiring manager. But this is only worth doing if you meet one or more of the criteria above, or a few other situations I’ll explain below… ## Two more cases where it’s important to send a cover letter First, you should send a cover letter if an employer specifically says it’s required on their website or job application form (however, having an optional field to include it is not the same as asking for it or saying it’s required). And second, you should send a letter if you have a large gap in employment or something unusual in your background that you feel the need to explain, and you don’t feel your resume explains it well enough on its own. (Although I do like addressing gaps in employment directly on your resume employment history section when possible. For example, if you took a year off to raise a kid, you could say: “2018-2019: One-year break from work to raise first child.” So do try to explain this type of thing on your resume if you can!) ## When You Don’t Need a Cover Letter If you don’t fall into any of the situations we looked at above, then a cover letter is not needed. For example, if you’re just applying for jobs online via job boards, via LinkedIn, on company websites via their “careers” page, etc., then I’d skip it! Send your resume and let it speak for itself. (And if you don’t have a great resume yet, you can get help here.) In my opinion, the extra time and effort just isn’t worth it when you’re applying online with no prior relationship, no referral, and no special knowledge of the hiring manager or job requirements that you can use to make your case for why they should interview you. This is one reason I love LinkedIn EasyApply as a part of an online job search – because a cover letter is not required or even expected. **Of course, the final judgment call is yours!** If you’re applying to your dream employer and you don’t mind spending an hour writing up a great cover letter, then go ahead! It can’t hurt in a one-off scenario like this. But the main point I’m trying to make here is: **You should be selective about when to send a cover letter, rather than feeling obligated to send it by default.** ## Recap: How Important is a Cover Letter? The answer to how important a cover letter is depends on the hiring process and situation. If you read the information above, you now know when a cover letter is necessary/recommended, and when you probably shouldn’t bother. And you’ve seen that cover letters do matter in some cases, but that doesn’t mean that you always need to send a cover letter. And as mentioned earlier, the main benefit of this approach is time savings… **When you look at how much time and effort goes into writing each of these letters, it can add up to hours or days of wasted time if you’re sending cover letters without analyzing whether it’s necessary for the situation.** ## Tips for Writing a Good Cover Letter Now that we’ve answered whether a cover letter is necessary, and when it’s important, here are some tips and resources to help you in situations where you decide a cover letter is needed: First, I’d always recommend keeping it brief, easy to read (no huge paragraphs or blocks of text without spacing), and personal. It should feel like you’re talking directly to them! That means start with “Dear Bethany”, (for example), not with, “Dear Hiring Manager” or “Dear Recruiter”. (Recruiters almost never care about a cover letter anyway. It should be for the hiring manager). Also, make sure you’re saying the word “you” at least as often as you say the word “I”. Talk about their needs and their company, not just about yourself. The purpose of your cover letter is to point out similarities between your background and the employer’s job requirements. You want to demonstrate why you’re likely to succeed in their specific role, to sell them on interviewing you! And you cannot do this without researching their job and understanding/discussing their job. So this letter isn’t just about you, it’s about them just as much. If you follow the steps above, you’ll save time in your job search and maximize the number of interviews you get for the effort you put into your job applications!
  • Best Cover Letter Fonts for Applications

    When you submit a job application, it’s important that hiring managers can read your cover letter and resume easily. Choosing the right font for your application materials is essential in making this part of the process flow smoothly. In this article, learn what the best cover letter fonts are for your next cover letter. ## Why are cover letter fonts important? Choosing the right font is an important step to making sure your cover letter is legible and professional looking. By selecting a simple, easy-to-read font for your cover letter, you can increase the chance that your job application will make a good first impression on the hiring team. A cover letter with the correct spacing and size can also make it more visually appealing. A hiring manager may be more likely to read the content of your cover letter if it looks simple and businesslike. Sometimes, a hiring team may receive hundreds of applications. Since a cover letter is typically the first document a recruiter reviews, the format should be scannable so they can gather basic information about you and your qualifications. If your cover letter impresses a recruiter, they may be more likely to review the rest of your application materials and invite you to an interview. ## How to choose the best cover letter font Follow these steps to choose the best cover letter font: **1. Choose a font that you can use in your cover letter and your resume** When you’re choosing a font for your cover letter, make sure to pick a font that you can use throughout your application and resume. Using one font for both your cover letter and resume creates consistency and looks more professional. **2. Opt for a professional and easy-to-read cover letter font** When choosing a cover letter font, select a simple option that conveys your professionalism. Since the hiring team may read your application on a desktop, laptop or mobile device, you should ensure that your cover letter font is easy to read even on smaller screens. You can choose between a serif and sans serif font type. Serif fonts have small strokes at the ends of letters. Sans serif fonts have no strokes at the ends of letters. Opting for a serif font can add a personal style to your application, while choosing a sans serif font can make your letter look simple and straightforward. Here are the most popular cover letter fonts for job applications: - **Times New Roman**: As one of the most common fonts for professional documents, Times New Roman can make your cover letter appear uncomplicated. You can use Times New Roman when applying to most companies. - **Garamond**: This serif font features a classic appearance that can make both your cover letter and resume look professional. Garamond works best for printed cover letters. - **Cambria**: For a less formal option, you can consider Cambria. This is the standard font for Microsoft Word since it’s easy to read for many users. - **Georgia**: If you plan to email your cover letter, Georgia is an ideal font. You can also use it if you need to send your materials as electronic documents. - **Arial**: This is one of the most popular sans serif fonts, as it is visually appealing on both paper and electronic devices. -** Helvetica**: Similar to Arial, Helvetica is a simple, straightforward sans serif font. Many people believe Helvetica has a more sophisticated look, making it a popular option. - **Calibri**: With its narrow style, Calibri is easy to read on screens, making it a good choice for electronic applications. **3. Use standard formatting with your font** Your resume might include a variety of text formatting, such as bold or italics, to emphasize various details. However, you should use standard formatting throughout your cover letter for simplicity. **4. Select a professional font size and use it consistently** Choose a font size that is clearly legible. For most fonts, 12-point is the standard size, but some fonts may look better at 10- or 11-point. To find the ideal size for your cover letter, try each of these standard sizes to find the most legible version. Make sure your cover letter easily fits onto a single page. **5. Use appropriate spacing with your cover letter font** The spacing of your cover letter can also have an effect its readability, so it can be helpful to examine different options. Single, double and 1.5 spacing are the most common selections. Remember to leave 1-inch margins around the edges of the document for additional white space and improved legibility. **6. Review your cover letter font choice before submitting** After selecting a font, size and spacing, review the letter prior to submitting it. Make sure the entire cover letter appears both professional and legible. If you are emailing your application materials, consider sending the email to yourself first so you can review first before sending it to the hiring manager. **7. Save the font and formatting you use in your cover letter** If you plan to send your cover letter electronically, take steps to preserve the format first. When you email your application in word processing format, such as a Microsoft Word file, the formatting may not transfer correctly. Consider converting your cover letter and resume to a PDF file to retain the style. If you intend to copy and paste your cover letter into the body of an email, make sure to reapply the font, sizing and spacing to preserve its appearance.
  • Common Cover Letter Mistakes

    Cover letters offer you the chance to make a good first impression on an employer, so it’s important to avoid making mistakes. A cover letter serves as an introduction to your value based on your performance with previous employers and the value you can offer to your future employer. In this article, learn how to correct any mistakes when writing your cover letter so you can increase the content’s quality and influence an employer to hire you. ## What is a cover letter mistake? A cover letter mistake is an error you make when you’re trying to develop your story related to your professional experience. Mistakes can occur in the messaging of your content or with individual words that you’re typing. However, the mistakes you make can be discovered at any point during the editing process. ## Why is it important to think about cover letter mistakes? It is important to think about mistakes before you submit your cover letter with your resume. The mistakes you make on your cover letter might quickly deter an employer from reading your resume which could eliminate your chances for an interview. Improvements to the content of your cover letter might consist of prioritizing which experience you want to highlight or focusing on how you can edit your sentence structure for clarity. When you recognize cover letter mistakes, they can be a guide for you to identify a new approach as you revise your next cover letter and which way can it resonate with an employer. ## Common mistakes listed on your cover letter Check out this list of mistakes that you should watch out for when writing your cover letter: **Speaking too much about your career** You may make the mistake of talking about your experience more than the value you can offer to the company. Employers want you to expand on how your contributions can lead to their success. Your answer can demonstrate your viability as a candidate for this position and if you’re the right fit for the company’s culture. You should still note your accomplishments from positions with past employers to quantify your performance. **Discussing details from every employer you’ve worked for** You should pare down your cover letter to highlight the top achievements of your professional career. You’ll need to find out which experience is most relevant to the role you’re applying for. Another way to break down your experience is to demonstrate what skills you’ve learned throughout your career leading up to applying for the position. **Focusing on your past more than the present** You’re speaking in the present when you talk about how your experience benefits the employer. Make sure you keep this language consistent when you’re referencing your qualifications and the impact you can make on the organization. Your intent to grow the company is noticed more by employers than a full summary of past work experience. **Writing too much content and not leaving enough white space** Be sure to keep the cover letter under one page and leave room for white space. The amount of white space you have in your cover letter can increase its visual appeal and the readability of your content. You should aim to leave spaces between paragraphs and your signature, so the reader receives more clarity about the content’s structure. **Lack of examples to back up your claims** Provide examples of success within past roles to attract the employer to how you’ve contributed to a company. Employers look for transferrable skills like teamwork and communication to identify if you’re the right choice for the position. Specific examples make it easier for you to personalize your content and help the employer get to know you better. **Discussing your fandom of the company** Discussing your fandom of the company you’re applying for is similar to referring to the past. The difference is this approach solely discusses what attracted you to apply in the first place. An employer may ask this question during an interview, but you should focus on how you can offer solutions as a valuable contributor to their company in your cover letter. **Typos and grammatical errors** The identification of typos and grammatical errors is common when you’re writing any piece of content. You’ll need to be vigilant and document the errors you’ve found, so you can address them once you finish proofreading your cover letter. Make sure you read your cover letter content aloud and have someone else read it aloud before you send it and your resume to an employer. ## Tips to fix mistakes on your cover letter Refer to these steps for best practices on how to make corrections on your cover letter: **Write clear and concise content** The key to writing clear and concise content is to shorten your sentences. Sticking to the main point of what you’re trying to communicate assists the employer in understanding what you’re trying to say. Remember to balance your content with the valuable work experience you’ve earned and the immediate results the employer should expect to see upon hiring you. **Address the department’s manager** You should include the name of the manager for the company’s department in your cover letter. Even if they’re not the hiring manager for the position, they can pass your message along to the director or the vice president of the department. Addressing higher-level employees within the department can indicate that you pay attention to detail and have a desire to accept an offer for the position. **Add a referral if applicable** Using the name of a referral is crucial because they’ll know who to speak to about your experience. Check professional networking websites and contact people who work at the company you’re writing the cover letter for. Your referral should advocate for you and answer any questions they have after the employer reviews your cover letter. It’s recommended that you ask a contact to be your referral first before you list them on your cover letter. **Consider a different design** Make sure the design of your cover letter is the same as your resume to ensure consistency. The style of the design for your cover letter can enhance readability by putting more emphasis on the white space. Look at the various templates to determine which design embodies your work experience. **Inform the employer about how you plan on following up with them** Note at the end of your cover letter how you’ll follow up with the employer about the status of the position. Give your email and your phone number and state it’s the best way to contact you for an interview opportunity. **Email your cover letter to your email address** Email your cover letter to yourself, so you have a final look at its formatting. You can take this opportunity to proofread it and make any last-second edits.
  • How to Address a Cover Letter When Applying for a Job

    While addressing your cover letter may seem like a small part of your job application, your salutation may be the first thing an employer reads on your application. An appropriate opening can leave a good first impression and set the tone for a successful application that engages the interest of an employer. This article explains how to address a cover letter depending on the information available to you about the job you are applying for. ## Who should you address a cover letter to? While you may not be certain who will read your cover letter when applying for jobs, there are a few best practices for addressing a cover letter. Unless a job description includes information on a different person to send application materials to, you should address your cover letter to the hiring manager for the position. ‘Dear Hiring Manager’ is an appropriate greeting for situations when you don’t know the hiring manager’s name, but seeking out details about the team you would be working with shows that you have a strong interest in the company and pay attention to details. ## Methods for finding the hiring manager’s name The following methods can help you find the hiring manager’s name when applying for a new job: **Check the application materials** Sometimes a job posting or other application materials have the name and title of the person reviewing your application listed. Many companies include information about who to contact in order to streamline the job search process, so read the job listing carefully for any instruction on who to address your letter to. Look at email addresses or social media profiles linked to the posting and see if the hiring manager’s name is listed. If you previously communicated with someone at the company about your application, consider reaching out and asking who you should address your cover letter to. **Look at the company website ** Some companies keep a list of key employees or even a full directory of their employees available on their website. They may have a separate careers page with information on a hiring manager, or you may be able to find the name of a human resources representative for your position. Look for who the managers are for the department are applying to work with and determine who would work most closely with your position. You can also search for the company online and find outside information on their hiring structure. **Call the business** You can call the front office of a company and ask for the name of the contact person for the position you are applying for. Be sure to call during business hours and be as specific as possible so that you get the name of the correct person. If you are still not able to confirm the name of a contact, the company will likely expect applicants to use the name of their hiring manager’s position or even leave off the greeting entirely. ## How to address a cover letter Use these steps as a guide toward addressing your cover letter: **1. First, verify your information** Once you have the name or title of the person receiving your cover letter, make sure that all of your information is accurate. Do a quick search to see if they have any honorifics such as Dr. or Prof. that you can include in your greeting Avoid using gendered language such as ‘Mr.’ or ‘Ms.’ unless you have confirmed that they prefer to be addressed by that term. **2. Second, choose a salutation** Including a salutation is optional and based on personal preference. One option for beginning your cover letter is to simply list the name of the hiring manager followed by a comma. ‘Dear’ followed by their name and a comma is also a professional way to open your greeting. You should avoid less casual greetings such as ‘hey’ and ‘hello.’ **3. Third, use a consistent format** When addressing your cover letter, use the same font and style as the rest of your application materials. Your greeting should be above the body of your letter and below a header that includes your name and contact information. Use consistent spacing before and after the greeting to make the letter easier to read for the hiring manager while devoting most of the page to the content of your letter. **4. Lastly, proofread** Every time you send out a cover letter, proofread every part of it including the address. Proofreading can help you avoid accidentally sending one company a cover letter with another company’s hiring manager listed in the greeting. Confirm the spelling of any names or titles and have another person check your work for typos. You should also make sure that you are using proper capitalization for their name and title. ## Template for how to address a cover letter Here is a brief template you can use when crafting a new cover letter or adding to an existing one: [First name] [Last name] [Address] [City, State ZIP code] [Email] [Phone number] Dear [Honorific]. [First name] [Last name], [Body] ## Examples of how to address a cover letter These are all examples of an acceptable greeting for a cover letter: - Dear Hiring Manager, - Dr. Alison Choudary, - Dear Human Resources Manager, - Dear Revolve Marketing Team, - Dear Prof. Rivera, - Dear Sierra, - Ms. Cleo Thet, Regardless of whether you can find the name of the hiring manager or not, you can still include a professional greeting when addressing your cover letter. While the way you address your cover letter will not likely convince someone to hire you, a greeting with dated or unprofessional language can easily discourage a hiring manager from taking your application seriously. You can use only a first name or add a salutation and honorific depending on your preference. ## Tips for addressing a cover letter Use these tips to make sure your greeting is relevant and appropriate to the position: - Avoid phrases like ‘to whom it may concern’ or any other excessively formal language when possible. - Consider addressing the team you will be working with as a group if you do not have the name of your contact for the job. - If you have already communicated with the hiring manager, look at their email signature to see how they prefer to be addressed. For example, if the hiring manager signs their emails as ‘Mr. Dunlap,’ that is an indication that you should call him that as opposed to his full name. - When writing your cover letter or adapting it for a new position, make sure that every section including the greeting is professional and purposeful.
  • How to Write an Internship Cover Letter

    An internship is a great way to learn about a job without a full employment commitment. Whether you are in college or thinking about changing your line of work, an internship can give you the experience to help you decide if it’s a path for your career. When you apply for an internship, you will send a cover letter with your resume. This article explains the purpose of this cover letter and gives you tips on how to write one. ## What is an internship cover letter? An internship cover letter is one of the documents you will include with an internship application. The purpose of the cover letter is to summarize the information on your resume in a way that tells the employer why you are best qualified for the internship. While there is a correct format to the cover letter, you can still be creative. You can show that you are excited about interning with the organization. As you talk about your education and work experience, you are introducing yourself to the organization. They can gain a better understanding of who you are than from just reading your resume. ## How do I write an internship cover letter? Here are a few things you should keep in mind as you write your internship cover letter: **1. First, use the correct format** Your cover letter is a business letter, so be sure to follow the correct format. If you are sending your application by regular mail, you should start your letter with: - Your name, address and contact information - The date - The name of the person receiving your application (if known) - The organization’s address - Salutation or greeting (e.g., ‘Dear…’) If you are sending your application by email or an online form, begin with the salutation. You don’t need to include everything before that. You will, however, want to add your contact information to your email signature at the bottom. **2. Second, do your research** Find out as much as you can about the organization from websites or other resources. Use this information to show how well-suited you are to the organization. Draw attention to aspects of the organization that match your career goals and aspirations. **3. Third, make each letter unique** Target your cover letter to the specific internship you are applying to. You can do this by highlighting areas of your education and experience that are most relevant to that particular internship. Discuss aspects of the internship from the internship description that match with things on your resume. Not only does this show the employer your interest in this internship, but it also draws attention to ways you are qualified. **4. Then, use keywords from the listing** Use words and phrases from the internship listing that relate to your education and experience. For example, if the listing says the intern must have good communication skills, mention how you have developed your communication skills through editing the school newspaper. **5. Next, provide examples** Your resume will contain a list of your work experience to date. In your cover letter, you can describe how that experience is relevant. Select two or three examples of things you have done and briefly describe your tasks and responsibilities in a way that connects to the internship. **6. Then, highlight relevant academic and nonacademic qualifications** An internship is an entry-level position, so you will not be expected to have a lot of experience in that industry. Be sure to draw attention to classes you have taken that align with what the organization is looking for. Include volunteer work or other work you have done that demonstrates both hard and soft skills you can use. **7. Last, check your letter for grammar and spelling mistakes** Internships can be very competitive, so it is important that your cover letter is error-free. Take time to reread your letter. Watch out for spelling mistakes, especially ones that your word processor’s spell check might not catch. Also, make sure you are using correct grammar. Have a friend or family member read your letter. Often an objective reader will see mistakes you don’t see because you are too familiar with the text. ## Internship cover letter template You can follow this template to write your internship cover letter: Your name and contact information The Date Recipient’s name Recipient’s address Dear [recipient], Purpose of the letter and why you want to apply for the internship. Most relevant education and experience. Example(s) of your experience. Closing, Your name ## Example internship cover letter Dear Mr. John Jones, I am writing to apply for the summer internship at BookWise Literary Agency listed on Internships.com. I am currently in my final year of a four-year bachelor’s degree in English Literature at State University. After graduation, my desire is to work in publishing. This internship is the perfect opportunity for me to better understand the publishing industry. I have experience both as an editor and a book reviewer that I believe make me an ideal fit for this position. My current coursework has me reading widely from both classic and contemporary American literature. I have taken courses on creative writing, literary analysis and the mechanics of writing, which have improved my writing skills and helped me understand what makes a good story. In the summer before college, I interned at The City News, our local paper. I had the opportunity to sit in on editorial meetings and hear how they made decisions on which stories to pursue. The editor-in-chief often asked for my own editorial feedback. I learned a great deal from her about the editorial process. For the past three years, I have been running a book review blog, BelleOnBooks.com. Every week I post a review for a book I have read. My preferred genres are young adult and suspense, but I read a variety of genres. I have over 10,000 followers and often receive advance reader copies of books from publishers to review. I am interested in learning about publishing and am excited for this opportunity to read new submissions, write editorial letters and be a part of bringing new books into the world. Enclosed is my resume where you will find more details on my education and experience along with contact information for references. Thank you for your time and consideration Sincerely, Belinda K. Smith
  • How to Write the First Paragraph of Your Cover Letter

    Your cover letter is one of the first things that employers see when you apply for a new job. They use the content found in that letter with a copy of your resume to determine if you are worth a call back. A strong cover letter that highlights the top skills you have and shows how your experience can help you with the job at hand is the key to getting an interview from a company. Though you may have a hard time identifying your key skills and putting those skills together in a cover letter, you can use online cover letter examples to see how you can grab the attention of employers. ## Writing Your Cover Letter A good cover letter starts with your name, address, email address, and phone number listed on the top. Include the name and address of the employer just beneath your contact information. You can then use a simple "dear hiring manager" to start the letter, though it's often helpful to check the company's website and find the name of the hiring manager or the person in charge of interviewing employees. Sign the cover letter with your full name or the full name you used when applying for the position. ## The First Paragraph The first paragraph of your cover letter is the most important. It is what hooks the reader and makes a hiring manager want to learn more about you. Some of the things you should address in that first paragraph include: - where you first heard about the job opening - your current position - if you are currently in school and what level you are at, i.e. graduate school or college - what you study/studied in school - any personal connections you have to the job ## Making Your Cover Letter Count Have you ever had a song stuck in your head for hours? With the right opening, you can make your cover letter stick in the minds of potential employers in the same way. Keep the first paragraph of your cover letter short, succinct, and to the point.
  • Cover Letter With Salary Requirements

    This article on "Cover Letter With Salary Requirements" will help you write a good cover letter. ## How do you include salary requirements in a cover letter? If a company does not request salary requirements in your application, then don't supply. Stating what you expect for a salary when a company does not ask may dramatically lessen your chances of getting an interview. When an employer does request your salary requirements, note your ideal range, and note that the range is negotiable (if that's the case). A few tips and ideas are available below to help you complete this task in a professional manner. ## First of all, be reasonable When a company is looking to fill a position, they are looking for someone with the necessary qualifications – and they already have a figure in mind as far as salary. Try to up the average rate in the industry, and you will likely not get the job. The salary requirement you decide upon depends on several factors, including your years and depth of experience, the standard rate of the position within the industry, and what the company is willing to pay for your experience and skills. ## How to write a cover letter with salary requirements Begin your cover letter by listing your name and address at the top. Drop down a few lines, then include the name of the contact person with company address along the left-hand margin of the page. Next, address the recipient by name if possible, and avoid general salutations. The body of your salary requirements cover letter should be 3 to 4 paragraphs long, with the body discussing primarily your qualifications and talents, and how they are directly related to the job opening. Even though the company wants to know your salary requirements, the letter should be focused on you and your abilities. Talk about your experience and background briefly, explaining why you are the ideal candidate for the position. Indicate any special skills you possess such a problem solving, managing staff, leadership skills and other aspects that make you a good match for the job. Display enthusiasm and professionalism throughout your letter, so that the employer can easily see that you are excited about the prospect of being placed in the position. In the last paragraph is where you will want to state your salary requirements. ## What should I put for expected salary on a job application? You might begin the paragraph with a statement such as "Per your request" or "As you requested." Follow this with your requirements, and explain that the salary base does not include benefits, bonuses, etc. If your salary requirement is not hard and fast, communicate that the amount you indicated is negotiable and the factors that depend on. Use these guidelines, and you can write a cover letter with salary requirements that will impress any employer. Employers want candidates who show a genuine interest in the company, so write in an engaging, positive manner. ## What are your salary expectations for this role answer? Requesting and negotiating a reasonable salary can be difficult. Go into the meeting prepared with statistics. Research the national salary average listed under the Bureau of Labor Statistics and research local salaries with salary calculators in order to land a well-deserved offer.
  • Cover Letter Writing Tips

    A cover letter is one page in length and is job specific. You should be neat and concise and write a polished letter of application. If you don't know how to do it at first, you can follow some cover letter writing tips. Your cover letters have the same value that your resume. While the resume is a fact sheet, the cover letter is your sales pitches to a particular company. In fact, your cover letters allow you to orient your background to prospective employers' needs since you'll be writing an individual letter of application for each employment you send out. Your letters of application enable you to augment upon and emphasize specific aspects of your resume, with relation to the requirements of the particular position you want. As a consequence, ponder what the specific organization needs and address your letter to those needs. Many recruiters can detect form letters and don't take them as seriously as letters adapted to their specific company, so write a prudently adapted letter rather than a generic one that you send to every company to get your foot in the door for an interview. ## Advice on writing a good cover letter A cover letter is the ideal combination between a direct request and a persuasive letter, so while you are writing this document, you should keep the following cover letter writing tips in mind: - Be succinct and keep the cover letter short. Your letter of application should be just one page with the enough white spaces. - Organize your cover letter with the following order: an introductory paragraph, the biographical paragraph, and the concluding paragraph. - List your qualifications according of relevance, from the most to least. - You must use a standard font, 11 or 12-point type and it must be the same typeface of your resume. Don't forget to avoid italic or bold except for titles. - Avoid staring every paragraph or every line with the word "I". - You might use the same margin widths of your resume in your cover letter. - The cover letter might be single-spaced. - You must address the letter of application to a specific recruiter. If you do not have this information, you should call and get the adequate recruiter's name and gender. - You should individualize each cover letter. Avoid using a generic template. - It is mandatory to use proper grammar and be free of misspelling. - It is a good idea to begin sentences with action verbs. - Avoid including negative information or needless items. - You might list your technical knowledge early on and in detail. - Don't mention anything about your interests of payment and job benefits. - You should not put a page number on the cover letter. - Always use professional language. Never use jargon, along and a casual tone. - Your cover letter must be ease in reading. You don't need to talk about your all professional life. - Try to mention any achievement and awards that match with the job position. - Be original and creative. Your cover letter must invite recruiter to read your resume and call you for a job interview.
  • How to Write a Cover Letter for an Internal Position

    When applying for an internal job at your current company, you should create a cover letter to accompany your resume. A cover letter distinguishes you as a strong candidate for a promotion. It should outline your experience, qualifications and interest in the new role. In this article, you’ll learn how to write a cover letter for an internal position and provide a template and an example to help you write your own. ## What is a cover letter for an internal position? A cover letter for an internal position is a written statement that accompanies your application for a new role within your current organization. Similar to a standard cover letter, this type of message should discuss your professional accomplishments and your work experience to establish you as a strong candidate for the promotion. ## How to create a cover letter for an internal position Follow these steps to create a cover letter for an internal position: **1. Follow a standard cover letter length** Cover letters should average 250-350 words that span three to four paragraphs. If you submit a paper application, ensure that your cover letter is less than a page long using 12-point font. A shorter cover letter may not take full advantage of the potential that this introductory message offers, while a longer letter may need a more simplified narrative. **2. Begin the cover letter with the most important information** Start your cover letter by listing your contact information. State the date that you are submitting your application, and then list your company’s contact information, including the hiring manager’s name. Use a professional salutation like “Dear” before writing the body of the letter. **3. Write about your experience as a story or narrative for the hiring manager** Discuss your previous professional experience and the new skills and qualifications you developed in your current role. Even if you are already familiar with the hiring manager or you have discussed your experience in your initial interview, include this information in your cover letter as a reminder and to show your serious interest in the position as well as your readiness. Incorporate these elements into a narrative that explains why you are qualified for the promotion and how your experience will enable you to contribute in a unique way. **4. Discuss how you have improved your qualifications and skills in your current role** Use examples to discuss how you have learned and advanced in your current role. Consider mentioning training programs you have completed, certifications you have earned or objectives you have achieved. Mentioning the ways you have improved allows you to position yourself as an employee who can continually impact the company in a positive way. **5. Mention specific contributions and accomplishments you’ve made in your current role** Add data and figures to quantify the contributions you have made to the company. Consider mentioning additional revenue you generated or cost-saving initiatives you established. Adding these specifics helps the hiring team understand the value you have added to the company and assess what you could provide in the new role. **6. Thank the hiring manager for considering your application** Conclude your cover letter by thanking the hiring manager for their consideration. Prompt them to take the next step in the process, which may be interviewing you or having a formal discussion about the job opening. Finish the letter with a formal closing like “Sincerely” before adding your signature. ## Internal position cover letter template Use this internal position cover letter template to write your cover letter: Your Name Your Address | Your City, State, and ZIP Code | Your Phone Number | Your Email Address Today’s Date Hiring Manager’s Name Business Name Business Address Business City, State, and ZIP Code Salutation, The first paragraph should begin with a statement of your interest in the open position. Briefly summarize your career goals and unique qualifications. The second paragraph should discuss your qualifications for the job opening. Mention accomplishments and specific figures and data when possible. The third paragraph should expand on areas where you have improved since joining the company. Connect your achievements and skills to the job opening. The final paragraph should include a reminder of your interest and a prompt to take the next step in the hiring process. End by expressing gratitude. Formal Closing, Your Signature ## Internal position cover letter example Consider this cover letter a model for how to tell the story of your qualifications, goals and contributions. Use this example to help you write your cover letter for an internal position: Hannah Lee 123 Main Way | New York, NY 11110 | 555-555-5555 | hannah.lee@email.com July 1, 2019 Pat Smith ABC Business 123 Business Pkwy New York, NY 11101 Dear Ms. Smith, I am writing to apply formally for the Assistant Sales Manager position in the Sales and Marketing department. I was excited to learn about this newly created role, as I am eager to apply my leadership skills and extensive experience to a management role within the company. When I joined ABC Business three years ago as an Account Coordinator, I brought five years of experience in the sales field. Since then, I have gained experience managing sales teams and devising strategies, even leading my current team to exceed our quarterly goal by 15%. My initiatives have also increased team-wide efficiency by 10%, further adding to increased revenue for the sales department. In my three years in this Account Coordinator position, I have developed strong communication, problem-solving and management skills. I believe these skills, combined with my past experience and deep knowledge of the company, would allow me to contribute substantially to the Assistant Sales Manager role and the sales department’s objectives. I would appreciate the opportunity to discuss this Assistant Sales Manager position with you in person. Thank you in advance for your consideration, and I look forward to talking with you further. Sincerely, Hannah Lee
  • Best Ways to Write a Cover Letter Opening With Examples

    Crafting a stand-out cover letter takes a bit of time and effort but can make all of the difference between getting an interview and being passed up. The most important part of your cover letter is the opening. Learn how to write a compelling opening statement with examples for guidance. ## What is a cover letter opening? A cover letter opening is the first sentence and paragraph a hiring manager reads in your cover letter. ## Why is a cover letter opening important? Cover letter openings are important because a it is the best way to tell a potential employer about yourself, your skills, and why you want to work for them. Hiring managers view hundreds of cover letters for job openings, so the first paragraph needs to make an impression. ## Examples of cover letter opening sentences Here are some opening sentence techniques to consider. **Show passion for what you do** Passion drives success, and employers want potential candidates who will advocate for their company. An opening sentence that demonstrates the your passions and motivations for the job will help grab a hiring manager’s attention. Example: After three years working in different roles at early-stage startups, I’ve realized my greatest talent is writing incredible content and sharing it with the world. **Express your love for the company** Companies want to hire someone who already knows and loves what they offer. Convey enthusiasm with a story about your experience with their service or product. Such excitement demonstrates the motivation and dedication you will have as an employee. Example: I enjoyed your last speaking event in San Francisco so much I didn’t want to leave, so I didn’t. Instead, I searched for job openings with your company. **Start with an impressive accomplishment** Stand out by highlighting an accomplishment or skill that makes you unique among other similarly qualified candidates. Example: In the first six months of my entry-level sales job, I was named Top Salesperson and have held the title for eight months. **Be creative or humorous** An unconventional opening can intrigue a hiring manager, but be careful. Examine the job post and website tone and use your judgment to determine if charisma and humor are appropriate. Example: I could submit my credit card statements to prove how much I love online shopping, but I decided writing a cover letter would be a better approach. **Note a mutual connection** If a former or current employee at the company referred you, mention this in the opening statement of your cover letter. Employee referrals are important to hiring managers because they result in the best success rates. Example: I was excited to learn about this job through my former coworker, Eliza Woods. She works with Core Group, Inc. as a data analyst. **Mention recent good news about the company** Mentioning a recent current event about the company shows you’ve done your research. Tie this to your interest in working there or why you would be a great fit for the role. Example: I was impressed that your company was recently highlighted in the Fortune Tribute for your partnership with the Children’s Health & Wellness Foundation. **Begin with a powerful belief statement** A belief statement is an idea or value you care about that aligns with the company’s mission and values. Example: As a teacher, I believe that every student deserves to learn with their own unique style and grow with hands-on experience. ## Cover letter opening paragraphs examples Here are examples of full opening paragraphs with opening sentences to help guide your writing. **Show your passion** Example: After three years working in different roles at early-stage startups, I’ve realized my greatest talent is writing incredible content and sharing it with the world. While I gained transferable skills at these jobs, I wanted to make sure my first big career move would provide me with opportunities for professional development, mentorship, and the ability to showcase my writing talent. Enter, you: Mosaic Creative, LLC. **Love for the company** Example: I enjoyed your last speaking event in San Francisco so much I didn’t want to leave, so I didn’t. Instead, searched for job openings with your company. I was thrilled to see you are hiring a marketing manager skilled at increasing brand awareness and sales through social media marketing. With my 4+ years of experience building and monitoring successful Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn campaigns, I’m confident I’m a great fit for this role. **Impressive accomplishment** Example: In the first six months of my entry-level sales job, I was named Top Salesperson and have held the title for eight months. I’ve consistently earned a positive customer rating above 95% and exceed quarterly sales goals by more than 10%. I’m ready for my next big challenge in sales, and I believe the sales manager role at Lincoln Sales Company is it. **Creativity and humor** Example: I could submit my credit card statements to prove how much I love online shopping, but I decided writing a cover letter would be a better approach. So here I am, describing to you all the reasons I can take Seaside Boutique to the next level. As a current in-house stylist of three years and a successful fashion blogger with over 20,000 website views a month, I’m confident I can expand your subscription-based styling business into a household name. **Network connection** Example: I was excited to learn about this job through my former coworker, Eliza Woods. She works with Core Group, Inc. as a data analyst. We worked closely for two years, most recently on a complex market research project at Meridian Associates. She thought I would be a great match for the market research analyst position on your team. **Newsworthy mention** Example: Your company was recently highlighted in the Fortune Tribute for your partnership with Children’s Health & Wellness Foundation. After reading the article, I quickly felt inspired to seek an employment opportunity with you because of my personal belief in the Children’s Health & Wellness Foundation mission. I was pleased to see your opening for an event coordinator. With five years of experience managing corporate events, I believe I would be the perfect candidate for this job. **Belief statement** Example: As a teacher, I believe that every student deserves to learn with their own unique style and grow with hands-on experience. It’s clear that Bayside Elementary School values a variety of learning techniques and activities that drive curiosity, and I would love to be a part of such a progressive-minded institution as your art teacher.
  • How to Format a Cover Letter: Best Font, Size and Layouts

    A cover letter is meant to highlight why you’re the perfect fit for the position you’re applying for. It should capture the employer’s attention, leaving them with a memorable impression of you. Every job that you apply for should have a unique cover letter. This article explains how to present the information in your cover letter in a visually organized format, using the best font, size and layout. ## Best format for a cover letter Learning how to format a cover letter is one of the first things you’ll need to do before applying for a job. Most employers will insist that you submit both a resume and a cover letter when applying for a job. This is important to know especially when applying for your first job⁠ because you might not have any previous experience with this process. A well-written cover letter will consist of a meaningful introduction, concise examples of relevant skills and work experience, and a brief conclusion. The most effective cover letters focus on having these elements for the best format: - Readable font style - Standard font size - Visually appealing layout The body of the cover letter should be written in about three short paragraphs, on one page and you should identify the reason behind why you want to join the organization. However, if you submit your resume using the incorrect fonts, font sizes or layout, you may be eliminated from the job pool no matter how compelling your personal story is. ## Tips for choosing the best font for a cover letter The secret to writing a pleasant-looking cover letter is to make sure you’re including all of the fundamental sections while also focusing on using the best fonts, font sizes and layout. Some of the best fonts to use are: - Arial - Book Antiqua - Calibri - Cambria - Didot - Garamond - Georgia - Helvetica - Trebuchet The best cover letters use fonts that are easy to read in print and on screens. Make sure your cover letters are written using fonts that make it easy for both a human recruiter and a software tracking system to read. In most cases, it is a good idea to use simple, modern fonts and avoid adding color to the font. Keep in mind, this doesn’t mean to eliminate all creativity in your cover letter. Essentially, you need to make sure that the font used in your cover letter does not overwhelm the ability of the hiring manager or software bots to read or properly scan. To satisfy both parties, you’ll need to find a balance between design and simplicity. ## Common font sizes for a cover letter Too large or too small of a font size can be a challenge for both the hiring manager and the parsing software to read. The ideal font sizes are 10, 11 and 12. Here are some tips you can follow to help you decide what font size to use for your cover letter: - Use the font size 10 when trying to keep the cover letter to no longer than one page - Use font size 12 when you’re trying to fill the page out a bit more - In all other cases, the preferable font size is 11 For example, if you’re using font size 11 and your cover letter fills only about half the page, go ahead and increase it to 12 to fill out the page to make the entire document more visually appealing. Also, in cases where your cover letter exceeds one page, do not decrease the font to below 10 to try and fit it all on one page. The best solution is to rework the letter to decrease the overall word count. ## How to format a cover letter The formatting of a cover letter should align with the business and the industry for which you are applying. For example, if you’re applying for a position in the finance industry, you should not have a creative or flashy-looking cover letter with colorful borders and exotic fonts. Instead, focus on creating content that matches keywords, while keeping a clean, modern look. Here are some steps you can follow to format your own cover letter: **1. First, begin by listing the date and your contact information** **2. Second, address the hiring manager with a salutation or greeting** **3. Third, use the opening paragraph to introduce yourself and state why you’re interested in the open position** **4. Next, use the middle paragraph to outline your relevant experience, qualifications or skills that make you the ideal candidate** **5. Then, include a closing paragraph to thank the hiring manager for their time and consideration** **6. Finally, add a complimentary phrase and your signature to close the letter in a friendly way** Each of the elements in your cover letter should all use the same font and font size throughout the entire document. The layout should be consistent with a typical business letter with a left-margin justification. Also, the cover letter should be single-spaced and a return should be placed between each of the six sections. Finally, when submitting the cover letter, make sure it is in a compatible file format, such as a Microsoft Word document or PDF. This will ensure that the parsing software and the hiring manager can properly open the document.
  • Do Employers Care About Cover Letters?

    Cover letters have long been an important part of the job application process. However, some now suggest that modern recruiting methods may make the cover letter obsolete. In this article, we explore whether you still need a cover letter with your resume and provide you with some tips on how to write a cover letter. ## Are cover letters important? Yes, cover letters are still important. Even if your cover letter goes through the application process unread, an employer may still expect to see it attached to your resume. This is especially true if the hiring manager asked for a cover letter as part of the application process. A cover letter also shows the employer that you take the job opportunity seriously and are prepared to take more initiative to be considered for the job. It's also possible the hiring manager will actually look at your cover letter when selecting applicants to interview. ## Purpose of a cover letter A cover letter gives you the chance to highlight anything on your resume in more detail to point out your special qualifications. A resume documents your skills, education and experience. With a cover letter, you can make the connection between the resume and the job. This could mean that you may not have to customize your resume as much for each job application, since you can use your cover letter to show how your skills and experience are relevant. Your cover letter also allows you to show your writing skills, which is important for creative and administrative roles. These could all be important considerations for the hiring manager when selecting quality candidates for an interview. ## When do you need a cover letter? There are occasions when you need to include a cover letter with your resume. These include: - When the job application tells you to include a cover letter - If the hiring manager or recruiter asks for a cover letter - When you know the hiring manager by name or have an existing relationship - If someone referred you to the job, in which case you should mention who referred you in the cover letter ## When should you not include a cover letter? On the other hand, there may be times when you should not include a cover letter with your resume. For example, if the job application explicitly states that you should not send a cover letter or if the application process doesn't provide a way for you to submit a cover letter with your resume, which sometimes happens with online application forms. ## How to write a professional cover letter As you adapt each cover letter to make it relevant for each job application, there are certain things you should include in all of them: **The hiring manager's name** If possible, address your cover letter to the hiring manager. This information may be given on the job posting. Alternatively, you could call or email the company and ask to whom the application should be addressed. If you are unable to get the person's name, you can replace it with their job title, team or department. **Your contact information** Be sure to include your name, email address and phone number on the cover letter. This information will be on your resume as well, but putting it all on the cover letter can help save the hiring manager time. Also, should your cover letter and resume be separated, the hiring manager can still contact you. **The job title** Quote the exact title of the job for which you are applying. You can put this at the beginning of the letter, either on its own line ("Re: Systems Analyst/Programmer position") or in your opening sentence. **The correct tone** Your cover letter should be formal and professional. However, you can adapt your cover letter to fit the style of the business. Check the company's website and social media to help you determine the appropriate tone to use. **What you offer** Discuss how your skills and experience can contribute to the company's success. This is an opportunity to show how much you know about the business. It also allows you to demonstrate how the qualifications on your resume line up with the needs of the company. Look for keywords in the job description and be sure to include them in your cover letter. **A call to action** This is simply a closing line thanking the hiring manager for considering your application, and inviting them to read your resume and call anytime to schedule an interview. If there are times you are not available, this would be a good place to mention them.
  • A Good Cover Letter Is More Important Than You Think

    Have you wondered whether writing a cover letter to send with your resume is a waste of time? You're not alone if you said yes. But recruitment companies and employers will tell you that it’s an essential part of your job application. In fact, a short, well-written cover letter could boost your chances of getting a job interview This link will open in a new window. The cover letter is your first chance to make a good impression. Highlight your selling points and answer the seven main questions that an employer will have: - Can you do the job? - Do you have the right qualifications, knowledge, skills, abilities and experience? - Will you do the job well? - Are you reliable, self-motivated and enthusiastic? - Will you fit into the organisation? Are your values and goals a good match? - Will you make a good impression on clients and co-workers? - Do you have good written communication skills? ## How to structure your letter Structure your cover letter in a logical manner. This will show the employer that you have a rational approach. If you can, make it look professional by using an Australian business letter format. Always include your name, mobile number and email address. Include the recipient's name and address (if available), with the date in between. If you’re submitting your job application by email, you can include the letter in the body of the email. In this case the date and your email address will be automatically visible (you will not need to type them in). **Salutation (greeting)** Personalise the letter to make sure it reaches the person who will be reviewing your application. Consider these tips: - If you can, address the cover letter to a named person. You want it to get to the person who makes the decision to hire. - Check names and titles. You must spell these correctly. - If you don't know the name of the employer, phone the organisation. Ask the receptionist or the Human Resources department who the right person would be. - Don't assume the gender of the recipient. 'Jo', ‘Sam’ or 'Kim', for example, may be a man or woman. Phone to make sure or look online to see if you can work it out. - Some companies don't give out staff names and details. If you can't find the right name, address your letter to 'The employer' and use 'Sir/Madam' in the greeting. - It’s best to begin cover letters with ‘Dear ...' **Opening paragraph** Introduce yourself briefly and state the position you're applying for. If you’re not applying for a named job, state your job objective. Note where and when you found out about the position. This helps the company determine the best way to advertise jobs. If someone referred you to this employer, mention that person's name. Now make a strong statement that shows how valuable you would be to the employer. Give one good reason why you should be hired. **Your qualifications and skills** Write one or two paragraphs to show you can do the job. Show how your skills will meet the employer's needs. Address the key skills or criteria listed in the job advertisement. If you are approaching an employer directly, and there is no job advertisement, think logically about the skills required for the role. If you would be required to service customers, then communication skills would be important. If the role involves using a computer, then accuracy and an eye for detail would be key. If you have had a similar job before, describe how it gave you the experience or skills that are needed for this job. Your resume should outline your relevant skills, experience, training and achievements. If the employer hasn’t asked for a resume, include this information in the cover letter. Your skills may be technical or personal. You may have gained them through previous jobs, education or training, work experience, voluntary work or other activities. Introduce two or three of your selling points and show how they will allow you to make an impact or get results in the role. Briefly explain your current situation – whether you are working, have just returned from travel or are studying. **Your interest in working for the organisation** Here's where you show how motivated and enthusiastic you are, and how you can fit into the organisation. Make some positive comment about the company and let them know why you want to work there. This does not mean listing all reasons you want a job. Refer to something the company takes pride in. This may be their reputation, corporate culture or management philosophy. It could be their size, sales record, product quality or sense of environmental responsibility. Show you’ve done some research and looked at their website and that you are a good fit. Your resume is usually the place to address any personal interests or activities that connect you with the company and its work. However, if the employer doesn’t ask for a resume, include any personal interests in your letter. **Closing paragraph** It’s important to finish off your cover letter in a professional manner. Consider something formal such as: ‘Thank you for taking the time to consider my application. I look forward to hearing from you in due course.’ You should then conclude with ‘Yours sincerely’ and your full name. An impressive cover letter may persuade the recruiter that you're worthy of second-round consideration. Hopefully, you'll be well on your way to employment.
  • 4 Things Your Cover Letter Must Include This Year

    First impressions count and when you’re applying for jobs, that means your cover letter is your opening move. A good cover letter should cover the basics: your skills and what you can bring to the role. But in today’s competitive job market, there’s always more you can do to get noticed. **Keep it brief.** If Twitter has taught us anything, it’s that you can say a whole lot with just a few words. While cover letters don’t need to be under 140 characters, too many candidates labour over long letters that won’t be read in detail – they’re read quickly to look for key highlights that align to the role, and to scan for errors. So keep your cover letter focused - anywhere between 150 to 350 words is best. You can still show why you’re worthy of getting onto the shortlist within that word count. Keep your letter focused on your skills and potential and leave all the puffery behind - you’ll be surprised you ever used those extra words at all. **Be yourself.** We’re always on our best behaviour when writing cover letters but it can lead to awkward, formal writing. It’s the sort of writing that’s hard to read because the details that will make a boss want to hire you are hidden under a wall of “dear sir/madams”, “and “I am a self-starter team player who can work without direction”. That best behaviour voice won’t get you an interview because it’s missing what’s so special about your job application: you! Write your cover letter with the same voice you’d use at a meeting: relaxed, knowledgeable, to the point and with the odd joke or bit of personality thrown in (if appropriate). Let employers know who you are and why they want to arrange an interview. **Show that you’re the solution to all their problems.** Employers have a problem: they need someone to fill a vacant role and reading applications and interviewing people takes time away from their jobs. What they really want is for you to show them you’re the solution to all their problems. Research the company or industry and work out what challenges they’re facing. Do you have a solution? Tell them how you can help with your ideas, skills or experience. Even if you’re addressing key selection criteria, show what you achieved and use their questions to show results. **It’s more than repeating your resume.** Don’t give a short version of your resume in your cover letter. If an employer wants to read your resume, they will grab that file. What they want to read is about you – what can you show them that is different from every other cover letter? Why would they want to read your resume? What is it that makes you the person they must interview? It’s not just your work history: they want to know how you approach problems, and your interest in both the industry and their company. Charles Young, Director of recruitment agency Citak, agrees. He recommends “give more than what is in your CV - try to prove your interest in the job or industry; that will always help you”.
  • How to Write a Career Change Cover Letter

    A career change cover letter can help you explain why you have decided to pursue a new career. Knowing how to explain to a hiring manager why you are choosing a new career path is a part of the job transition process. In this article, you can learn more about the important steps for writing a cover letter for a career change. ## Why is a career change cover letter useful? A career change cover letter is a business letter that explains why and how you are choosing to switch to a new career. An employer or hiring manager may wonder why you are changing careers and if you have the skills for your new career. You can use your cover letter to explain this to a hiring manager as well as provide details about why you considered the career change and how you obtained the skills and education necessary. ## How to write a cover letter for a career change Here are some steps you can follow to create a career change cover letter: **1. Firstly, get the reader’s attention** It’s important to sound enthusiastic about the job to show that you are ready to take on new responsibilities. Showing that you are enthusiastic can help encourage the hiring manager to read your cover letter and see that you are serious about your career change. **2. Secondly, describe your education** Describe any relevant education in your cover letter. This could include the education you have obtained in your previous career as well as any education or training you received for your career change such as relevant certifications. **3. Next, explain your reasons for switching careers** People make the decision to change careers for a variety of reasons. When writing your cover letter, explain why you want to change careers. Keep the tone simple and positive, and avoid saying anything negative about your previous industry or employer. **4. Lastly, mention transferable skills and skills you learned for the new career** Mention any skills you have that are transferable and relevant to your career change in your cover letter, as well as those you obtained specifically for the new career. When you are writing a cover letter for a career change, you need to identify any skills, strengths and experiences that you had in your previous job that are relevant to your new career. While some skills may be specialized for your new career, others are more general and can be applied to many industries. ## Career change cover letter tips Here are some tips for writing career change cover letter: **Give an honest assessment of your education and skills** Always be honest and transparent about the skills and qualifications you have that make you an ideal candidate for the position. If there are skills or educational requirements you don’t have, you could mention that you are obtaining or plan to obtain these qualifications, if applicable. **Emphasize transferable skills** Focus on any transferable skills you have that can be used in the position you are applying for, rather than those related to your current job title. For example, if you are leaving a job as a writer to pursue a new career as a programmer, describe what computer languages you are experienced with. **Express your excitement for the company** Describe your excitement about the company and your passion for what they do. Employers may be more interested in a candidate who expresses genuine enthusiasm about the position and company than they would someone who simply wants a new job. Demonstrate that you have researched and are familiar with the company and its mission.
  • How to Write an Internship Cover Letter

    An internship is a great way to learn about a job without a full employment commitment. Whether you are in college or thinking about changing your line of work, an internship can give you the experience to help you decide if it’s a path for your career. When you apply for an internship, you will send a cover letter with your resume. This article explains the purpose of this cover letter and gives you tips on how to write one. ## What is an internship cover letter? An internship cover letter is one of the documents you will include with an internship application. The purpose of the cover letter is to summarize the information on your resume in a way that tells the employer why you are best qualified for the internship. While there is a correct format to the cover letter, you can still be creative. You can show that you are excited about interning with the organization. As you talk about your education and work experience, you are introducing yourself to the organization. They can gain a better understanding of who you are than from just reading your resume. ## How do I write an internship cover letter? Here are a few things you should keep in mind as you write your internship cover letter: **1. First, use the correct format** Your cover letter is a business letter, so be sure to follow the correct format. If you are sending your application by regular mail, you should start your letter with: - Your name, address and contact information - The date - The name of the person receiving your application (if known) - The organization’s address - Salutation or greeting (e.g., ‘Dear…’) If you are sending your application by email or an online form, begin with the salutation. You don’t need to include everything before that. You will, however, want to add your contact information to your email signature at the bottom. **2. Second, do your research** Find out as much as you can about the organization from websites or other resources. Use this information to show how well-suited you are to the organization. Draw attention to aspects of the organization that match your career goals and aspirations. **3. Third, make each letter unique** Target your cover letter to the specific internship you are applying to. You can do this by highlighting areas of your education and experience that are most relevant to that particular internship. Discuss aspects of the internship from the internship description that match with things on your resume. Not only does this show the employer your interest in this internship, but it also draws attention to ways you are qualified. **4. Then, use keywords from the listing** Use words and phrases from the internship listing that relate to your education and experience. For example, if the listing says the intern must have good communication skills, mention how you have developed your communication skills through editing the school newspaper. **5. Next, provide examples** Your resume will contain a list of your work experience to date. In your cover letter, you can describe how that experience is relevant. Select two or three examples of things you have done and briefly describe your tasks and responsibilities in a way that connects to the internship. **6. Then, highlight relevant academic and nonacademic qualifications** An internship is an entry-level position, so you will not be expected to have a lot of experience in that industry. Be sure to draw attention to classes you have taken that align with what the organization is looking for. Include volunteer work or other work you have done that demonstrates both hard and soft skills you can use. **7. Last, check your letter for grammar and spelling mistakes** Internships can be very competitive, so it is important that your cover letter is error-free. Take time to reread your letter. Watch out for spelling mistakes, especially ones that your word processor’s spell check might not catch. Also, make sure you are using correct grammar. Have a friend or family member read your letter. Often an objective reader will see mistakes you don’t see because you are too familiar with the text. ## Internship cover letter template You can follow this template to write your internship cover letter: Your name and contact information The Date Recipient’s name Recipient’s address Dear [recipient], Purpose of the letter and why you want to apply for the internship. Most relevant education and experience. Example(s) of your experience. Closing, Your name
  • How to Write a Relocation Cover Letter

    Applicants use a relocation cover letter to express interest in an organization that would require relocating to be able to accept the job. It can influence the employer to give you a chance to interview with them and answer any logistical questions they have. This article explains the steps for writing a relocation cover letter to open up additional job opportunities. ## Why do you need a relocation cover letter Writing a relocation cover letter is important if you’re looking for work in another city, state or country. Make sure to address why an employer should invest time and resources in you. A relocation cover letter answers questions about your location before you step into an interview room with an employer. ## How to write a relocation cover letter Here are some steps you can follow to write and format a relocation cover letter: **1. First, provide your contact information** Give the employer the necessary contact information so they can contact you directly if they’re interested in your candidacy. Add your first and last name, physical address, city, state, zip code, a phone number and an email address before moving on to the next step. **2. Second, list the date you’re submitting your cover letter and the organization’s details** Leave a space after your contact information and list the date you’re sending the cover letter. Target the letter to the human resources director or hiring manager. You’ll need to add the company’s information under the HR contact’s name. **3. Third, write an opening greeting** The opening greeting formally initiates the dialogue you’re having with the employer. **4. Fourth, state the reason why you’re writing a relocation cover letter** You’re writing the cover letter to show your interest in the position you are applying for. Showing your interest is vital, so the employer knows from the beginning that you’re committed to working for them. You also want to show that you know the steps you need to take will differ from accepting a position in your area. **5. Fifth, list the skills you bring to the position you’re applying for** After you list why you’re interested in the position, provide evidence of your experience that demonstrates your qualifications as a candidate. Use quantifiable statistics when possible to draw attention to the results you’ve produced for other organizations. **Example:** ‘Some of the skills and experience that I can offer include: - 5 years of experience selling content services to clients - Responsible for the increase of customers by 20 percent annually over the last three years - Extensive knowledge of lead generation and sales cycles - Robust technological, interpersonal and problem-solving skills - A team-oriented mindset that focuses on the company’s success’ **6. Next, state when you’ll be visiting the area** Reiterate how your contributions will be valuable to the organization and show your interest in speaking with them directly in addition to the next time you’re in the area. **Example:** ‘Again, I believe that my expertise in sales would allow me to become a vital member of the team at Flash Content Agency. I would like to speak with you further about this opportunity, and how I can be in service to the organization. I am available for travel to meet in person, so please advise the best time to meet regarding the open Sales Manager position.’ **7. Finally, finish your cover letter and conclude with a salutation and your name** Complete the cover letter with a short conclusion, along with a salutation and your name. You can use the conclusion to show your willingness to move to the city where the job is located to demonstrate your commitment. **Example:** ‘As I plan to relocate to Orlando, I am prepared to cover any relocation costs. Thank you for your consideration for this position. Sincerely, Philip Stanley’ ## Relocation cover letter template Here’s a relocation letter template that you can use as a guide to write your own: [First and Last Name] [Physical Address] [City, State and Zip Code] [Phone Number] [Email Address] [Date of when the application is sent to the employer] [Dear First Name and Last Name of the Human Resources Director or Hiring Manager], [Beginning of the body paragraph. State your interest in relocating for this job opportunity. State that you’re the right for the position and refer to your resume as well.] [Discuss the skills and experience that make you a qualified candidate for the position. You can list them in bullet points or in paragraph form.] [Reiterate your confidence that the position is the right fit for you and express that you want to speak with them in person. List specific dates that you’ll be in the area for them to meet with you.] [Conclude by showing your willingness to relocate and thank them for considering your candidacy for this position.] [Sincerely, First and Last Name]